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Chaos in Hong Kong parliament as pan-democrats stage walkout

There was chaos in Hong Kong's parliament on Thursday as pan-democrats staged a walkout, with some of them throwing objects at Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying.

HONG KONG: There was chaos in Hong Kong's parliament on Thursday as pan-democrats staged a walkout, with some of them throwing objects at Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying.

It was Mr Leung's first Question and Answer session after Tuesday's massive pro-democracy rally, and he criticised the aggressive behaviour of some pro-democracy lawmakers.

As soon as Mr Leung walked into the chamber, pro-democracy legislators raised placards and shouted "Real democracy, no screening! "

Some of the more radical lawmakers then started throwing objects at Mr Leung. A glass of water was also thrown at him.

Four disruptive lawmakers were forcibly ejected, and the remainder of the pan-democrat legislators held up signs before leaving the chamber.

Mr Leung said: "We all saw what happened. There were councillors hurling objects, and there's a piece of broken glass here. I must ask the Legislative Council and the entire community to take this case seriously."

The man who threw the glass of water at the Chief Executive -- independent lawmaker Wong Yuk-Man, nicknamed 'Mad Dog' -- remained unapologetic.

Mr Wong said: "I threw a lot of things. I can't remember, water, whatever. If I had a chance, I would've thrown eggs as well."

Others accused Mr Leung of being indifferent towards Hong Kongers' call for democracy.

Emily Lau, chairwoman of the Democratic Party, said: "What did we see CY Leung do, he did not respond or you can say he responded with disdain. We are furious and the Hong Kong people are furious. That's why we've taken this action, completely unprecedented."

Some pro-establishment legislators hit out at the disruption.

Priscilla Leung Mei-Fun, a legislator with the Business and Professionals Alliance for Hong Kong, said: "If we want to fight for democracy, we want democracy to go towards a very high quality road, but not with this kind of disruptive culture.

"It sets up a very bad example and it cannot achieve the purpose of getting a consensus under the framework of the Basic Law."

In that vein, the chief executive called for a more rational discussion on the controversial issue of political reform.

Mr Leung said: "Let's strive for common greatest consensus, so that more than five million eligible voters in Hong Kong can elect the next Chief Executive by one person, one vote by 2017."

He also ruled out stepping down and dismissed suggestions that the relationship between lawmakers and his administration was poor.

Both the government and the legislature have been paralysed by protests both inside and outside the chamber. Pro-democracy activists, who are in the minority in the chamber, have resorted to filibustering important funding requests and legislation. Critics said this has hurt the city's competitiveness.

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