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Overweight and asthmatic? It could be the nose

A new study involving up to 1000 obese adults and children has found that such individuals breathe up to 50 per cent more air, making them possibly more vulnerable to health issues linked to air pollution.

Montreal: A new study carried out by the School of Public Health at the University of Montreal has found that those battling obesity breathe up to 50 per cent more air, making them possibly more vulnerable to health issues lnked to air contaminants.

In the research involving some 1000 individuals aged between five and 96 years, it was found that overweight and obese adults breathe 7-50 per cent more air every day compared to someone of normal weight, while overweight and obese children breathe in 10-24 per cent more air.

"We observed that half of the type 2 obese cohort (with a body mass index of 35-40) breathed 24.6-55 m3 of air every day, year after year, so it is clear that the amount of air they inhale every day exposes them to more contaminants" said Dr. Pierre Brochu.

"It remains to be seen if high inhalation rates are a factor in the development of asthma and other lung diseases in adults and children," added Dr. Brochu who will be conducting another series of tests.

The latest findings published in the journal, Risk Analysis, were based on the amount of tracers exhaled by each participant in their normal surroundings, each minute of the day for a period of up to three weeks.

According to Dr Brochu, the findings are a source of concern in the case of children who have higher metabolism in relation to their low body weight, which means that they could be breathing in even more air pollutants while performing normal activities.

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