Corruption complaints and cases investigated by CPIB at record low

Corruption complaints and cases investigated by CPIB at record low

The number of corruption complaints and cases investigated by the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau hit a new low in 2016, according to statistics released by the bureau on Wednesday (Apr 12).

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The number of corruption complaints and cases investigated by the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau hit a new low in 2016, according to statistics released by the bureau on Wednesday (Apr 12).

SINGAPORE: The number of corruption complaints and cases investigated by the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB) hit a new low in 2016, according to statistics released by the bureau on Wednesday (Apr 12).

In 2016, CPIB received 808 complaints, an 8 per cent decrease compared to the number received in 2015. A total of 118 cases were subsequently pursuable, down from 132 cases in 2015. The majority of non-pursuable cases were because of insufficient, vague or unsubstantiated information.

CORRUPTION OFFENCES IN PRIVATE SECTOR

In 2016, there were 104 individuals prosecuted for corruption offences and 96 per cent of them were private sector employees. Custodial sentences were meted out to a majority of them as in some instances, the offences had consequences that would have negatively impacted the security of the nation, and stronger deterrence was necessary.

Based on the cases of private sector employees prosecuted in court, CPIB noted areas of concern in maintenance work, relating to removal of copper cables, cleaning and water-proofing services and wholesale and retail businesses relating to purchase and supply of fire safety, electrical and mechanical equipment.

"Corruption will always be a work in progress because of the innate human nature of greed and temptation, and the CPIB remains vigilant to keep Singapore corruption-free," said Wong Hong Kuan, director of CPIB.

NEW ANTI-BRIBERY STANDARD

A new Singapore Standard - the SS ISO 37001 - to help Singapore companies strengthen their anti-bribery compliance systems and processes was also launched by CPIB and SPRING Singapore on Wednesday. Companies that are venturing overseas can adopt the standard to benchmark the integrity of their governance processes against international standards and practices.

“By adopting SS ISO 37001, our companies will gain an additional stamp of confidence in their systems and processes to help them grow beyond Singapore’s shores. To encourage local enterprises to adopt the standard, SPRING will be working with public and private stakeholders to provide assistance in terms of training, consultancy, certification and funding,” said Choy Sauw Kook, assistant chief executive of Quality and Excellence at SPRING Singapore.

SPRING Singapore and the Singapore Accreditation Council will be working with stakeholders to develop an accreditation scheme for certification bodies by the end of this year.

Source: CNA/mn