Programmes that aim to tackle urban food production and antimicrobial resistance launched

Programmes that aim to tackle urban food production and antimicrobial resistance launched

03:01
Three new research programmes that aim to address global challenges were launched at the Campus for Research Excellence and Technological Enterprise (CREATE) on Friday (Dec 1). 

SINGAPORE: Three new research programmes that aim to address global challenges were launched at the Campus for Research Excellence and Technological Enterprise (CREATE) on Friday (Dec 1). 

CREATE is an international research hub built on institutional partnerships together with seven overseas universities - the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), University of California Berkeley, Cambridge University, ETH Zurich, Technical University of Munich, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Shanghai Jiao Tong University. 

The new programmes were announced by Minister for Finance Heng Swee Keat at a symposium celebrating CREATE's 10th anniversary. 

One of them, by the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), aims to solve challenges related to urban food and nutrient production in Singapore. 

Called Disruptive and Sustainable Technologies for Agricultural Precision, it seeks to develop nanosensor-based detection technologies to be applied in precision agriculture. 

This technology will help discover new plant biosynthetic pathways as well as optimise them for improved yields in production. The project will begin in January 2018 for an initial period of five years.

Another programme that will also begin in January 2018 is one that looks to tackle the global threat of drug-resistant microbes. This will also be formed by SMART, in partnership with Singapore’s universities and research institutions. 

While working to identify new antimicrobial drug resistant mechanisms, it also looks to develop new therapeutics diagnostics and drug delivery technologies and approaches.

A programme that looks to address issues in trust and security of cyber-physical systems - which integrate computational, networking, and physical processes - was also announced by Mr Heng. 

Trustworthy and Secure Cyber-Plexus, led by Professor David Nicol from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), involves a research team from SUTD and UIUC. 

The programme, which commenced in September, examines the reliability and security of cyber-physical systems in existing critical infrastructure. It will run for an initial period of five years.

Source: CNA/mz

Bookmark