Channel NewsAsia

Smart Nation: Wheels set in motion

During Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong's National Day Rally speech last week, he stressed that Singapore can do much more with technology and IT to make the Republic a Smart Nation. And the wheels have already been set in motion.

SINGAPORE: During Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong's National Day Rally speech last week, he stressed that Singapore can do much more with technology and IT to make the Republic a Smart Nation. And the wheels have already been set in motion.

Bus stops of the future need not just be functional. One bus stop at Jurong East is being redesigned for commuters to top up their cash cards and charge their phones while waiting for the bus.

Other innovations Singaporeans can look forward to include a new system that allows patients to do rehabilitation exercises at home under the supervision of therapists working remotely. This can potentially save patients time and money.

Mr Tony Tan, a patient, said: "At a rehab centre, a lot of patients are better off, some are worse off. For those worse off, they do feel a bit of inferiority, they feel that they are not up to the standards. But doing rehabilitation exercises at home, it doesn't matter in what condition you are, you can actually just do it at the way you want to do it."

The National University of Singapore (NUS) plans to market the new rehabilitation system by the end of this year.

Dr Gerald Koh, Associate Professor at Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, said: "Basically, the actions that we normally do, we take for granted. But for people with diseases, they may struggle to do - simple things like, for example, pouring water from a jug, drinking from a cup, feeding yourself or wearing a shirt, taking off the shorts. We hope this sensor will also be able to capture whether the patients are doing the exercises correctly."

The Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) also uses Smart Urban Planning technologies to enable planners to make better informed decisions. It is implementing an islandwide 3D Digital Urban Model System to facilitate urban design and planning work.

Mr Eugene Lau, URA executive architect, said: "Nowadays, planning is become more and more complicated. As Singapore's growth and population increase, we have to be very smart in our planning in order to make sure the city is sustainable. For example, if it's a commercial development, we can actually calculate roughly how much electricity this development will use, how much grey water (which refers to water from showers, bathtubs, laundry and bathroom sinks) recycling we can actually have and how much carbon footprint it will emit."

With the 3D Digital Urban Model, the public can have a better idea of the developments that are coming their way.