Where to find the cheapest Apple iPhone X in Asia

Where to find the cheapest Apple iPhone X in Asia

The latest smartphone from Apple is its most expensive yet, but is the price of the entry-level iPhone X the same everywhere? We compare eight Asia-Pacific launch markets.

Apple Senior Vice President of Worldwide Marketing, Phil Schiller, introduces the iPhone X during a launch event in Cupertino, California. REUTERS/Stephen Lam

SINGAPORE: When Apple launched its flagship smartphone - the iPhone X - on Wednesday morning (Sep 13), there were several things to note: Face ID, no more physical button on the screen (or bezel, for that matter), Animojis and augmented reality.

But it was the jaw-dropping price tag that caught the attention of even the most ardent Apple fanboy. After all, the entry-level 64GB iPhone X variant costs a cool US$999 (S$1,345) in its home market, making it the most expensive smartphone Apple has launched to date.

And customers across many Asian markets were left in even greater shock when local prices were revealed.

For instance, the same model of the iPhone X will retail in Singapore at S$1,648, or about S$300 more than the US price tag. This has caused many to question if it’s worth forking out that amount just to have the bragging rights of owning Apple’s latest smartphone.

Bear in mind that for that price, you could buy the entry-level MacBook Pro 13-inch model, retailing from S$1,299, and still have some cash to spare.

Some Channel NewsAsia readers were shocked at how much they would have to spend.

Hans Ng called the S$1,648 price tag "crazy", while Vincent Tay said that this was "never-ending sucking" by Apple.

Another reader, Jun Cai, said that buyers are "suckers" for Apple's marketing language: "How can anyone look at this and think it's worth their money is beyond me."

But those living in Singapore might feel a little relief that prices here aren't the highest among the eight Asia-Pacific markets that will have it at launch. 

So whose wallet will be hardest hit in the region? 

We took a look at who will have to pay the most (in Singapore dollar terms) and how regional prices stack up against what US consumers will pay:

Additional reporting by Nicole Chang.

Source: CNA/db