Channel NewsAsia

Knox vows to fight conviction "to the very end"

An emotional Amanda Knox told US television on Friday that she "couldn't believe" a court in Italy had again found her guilty of murder, vowing to fight her conviction "to the very end."

WASHINGTON: An emotional Amanda Knox told US television on Friday that she "couldn't believe" a court in Italy had again found her guilty of murder, vowing to fight her conviction "to the very end."

In her first television interview after an Italian court on Thursday reinstated her guilty verdict for the murder of Meredith Kercher, the American, fighting back tears, told ABC television that she would fight any return to Italy -- even if it meant going to the US Supreme Court.

"I will never go willingly back... I'm going to fight this to the very end," she said, adding "it's not right and it's not fair."

Asked if she was prepared for the possibility of extradition, she answered: "I'm not. Before that ever happens we have to go to the Supreme Court," Knox told ABC's "Good Morning America" program.

She said the court's guilty verdict "hit me like a train."

"I did not expect this to happen. I really expected so much more from the Italian justice system. They found me innocent once before," she said.

Knox added that she has kept in touch with a priest who counselled her during her incarceration, and that "he's reminded me that people still believe in me."

Knox, 26, spent four years in an Italian prison after being initially convicted of the murder of her English roommate Kercher in Perugia, Italy, where they were both studying in 2007.

She was freed when an appeals court threw out the conviction in 2011, but Italy's supreme court ordered the case retried and an appeals court found her guilty Thursday.

The court sentenced Knox to 28 years and six months in prison.

Her lawyer Ted Simon, vowed on CNN on Friday that his client would appeal the "unjust" verdict.

"She understands more than anyone that a wrongful conviction is unjust not just for the accused, but for the victim, their family as well as society, so she feels this very personally," Simon said.

He praised her "great resilience" after having been confronted with the "very difficult news" of the verdict in Italy.

"There was no evidence then and there's no evidence now," he maintained.

"That's why it becomes so incomprehensible how could there be a different verdict when there's no new or differing evidence."

Tweet Photos, Videos and Update on this Story to  #cna