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Suspect planning Mumbai-style London attack to walk free

A terror suspect feared to have been plotting to carry out a Mumbai-style attack in London will be freed from stringent controls on his movement by the end of the month, court papers showed on Tuesday.

LONDON: A terror suspect feared to have been plotting to carry out a Mumbai-style attack in London will be freed from stringent controls on his movement by the end of the month, court papers showed on Tuesday.

The British-Nigerian is one of around six suspects whose restrictions will be lifted in a move that is being challenged by the main opposition Labour party.

The MI5 intelligence service believes there is a chance that the suspect, identified only as CD, could rapidly gain access to firearms, with a "real risk" that he would try to revive plans to mount a terror attack in Britain similar to a massacre in India's business capital Mumbai in 2008 which left 166 people dead.

Court papers show that a judge found there was "every reason" to believe that another suspect would have killed himself along with a large number of other people if a transatlantic airline bomb plot had not been foiled in 2006.

Three other suspects are said to be prepared to travel abroad in order to engage in terror-related activity.

Prime Minister David Cameron's government introduced the court-backed terrorist prevention and investigation measures (Tpims) in January 2012 to restrict the activities of terror suspects who can neither be charged with a crime nor deported.

They replaced more restrictive control orders brought in under the Labour government which left power in 2010.

But Tpims are limited to two years, meaning the government is powerless to stop the restrictions being lifted.

Without the Tpims, the police and MI5 will have to monitor the men at an estimated cost of £20 million (24 million euros, US$33 million) a year.

Yvette Cooper, Labour's home affairs spokeswoman, was to call on Tuesday on Home Secretary Theresa May to explain if suspect CD and the other men remain a risk to the public.

"Theresa May can't hide away on this. Her decision to weaken terror controls means terror suspects described by the courts as highly dangerous only a year ago will now face no restrictions on London streets," Cooper said.

A terror suspect subject to a Tpim, 27-year-old Mohammed Ahmed Mohamed, is still missing after he changed into a burka at a London mosque and fled last November.

Heavily armed militants rampaged through India's business capital Mumbai in 2008, killing 166 people in attacks on luxury hotels, a railway station, cafe and Jewish centre.

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