Skip to main content

Advertisement

Advertisement

Asia

China passes law to cut homework pressure on students

SHANGHAI: China has passed an education law that seeks to cut the "twin pressures" of homework and off-site tutoring in core subjects, the official Xinhua news agency said on Saturday (Oct 23).

Beijing has exercised a more assertive paternal hand this year, from tacking the addiction of youngsters to online games, deemed a form of "spiritual opium", to clamping down on "blind" worship of Internet celebrities.

China's parliament said on Monday it would consider legislation to punish parents if their young children exhibit "very bad behaviour" or commit crimes.

With the new education law, local authorities will be told to "strengthen their supervision in order to reduce the burden on students in terms of homework and extra-curricular lessons", said Xinhua.

"Parents ... must allocate in a reasonable way for minors the time devoted to studies, rest, entertainment and physical activity in order not to increase their learning load and to avoid any Internet addiction."

The law will come into force on Jan 1 next year.

China's exam-oriented education system requires students to take exams from an early age and culminates in the feared university entrance exam at age 18 known as the "gaokao", where a single score can determine a child's life trajectory.

Many parents spend a fortune to enrol their children in the best schools or private lessons, which takes a toll on both their finances and the health of the youngsters.

In recent months, the education ministry has limited gaming hours for minors, allowing them to play online for one hour on Friday, Saturday and Sunday only.

It has also cut back on homework and banned after-school tutoring for major subjects during the weekend and holidays, concerned about the heavy academic burden on overwhelmed children.

Source: AGENCIES/aj

Advertisement

Also worth reading

Advertisement