Hong Kong reporters march against alleged police violence

Hong Kong reporters march against alleged police violence

Police swing their batons at protesters as they try to disperse pro-democracy activists after a mar
Police swing their batons at protesters as they try to disperse pro-democracy activists after a march at Sheung Shui, a town at the city's border in Hong Kong, China, Jul 13, 2019. (Photo: Reuters/Tyrone Siu)

HONG KONG: Seven Hong Kong media associations held a silent march in Hong Kong on Sunday (Jul 14) against alleged police violence. 

Several hundred reporters marched from a park in Admiralty near the Central Government Offices to the police headquarters, where they held up signs reading "Stop police violence, defend press freedom" and "Protect our fourth estate".

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Many Hong Kong reporters claim that during their reporting of recent large-scale protests, they have been driven away from events by police without justifiable reasons as well as being pushed, subjected to foul language and being hit by batons.

"This march is because reporters have come out to do independent reporting and interviews during the major recent issues, and the police forces have used inappropriate methods and weapons to handle the reporters. So that's why we have come to complain in this way," said 25-year-old Ming Pao Staff Association Chairperson Wendy Yu to Reuters.

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March organisers said that if the safety of journalists were threatened it would impact on their ability to monitor the exercise of public power by the police.

Hong Kong has been roiled by massive protests in recent weeks against a controversial extradition bill that could have seen fugitives handed over to mainland courts. 

Sometimes violent, the protests have drawn in millions of people, with hundreds even storming the legislature on Jul 1 to oppose the now-suspended bill.

Source: Reuters/ic

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