Funeral held for first victim identified in Lion Air crash

Funeral held for first victim identified in Lion Air crash

Jannatun Cintya Dewi, 24,  is the first victim to have been identified among the 189 believed killed
Jannatun Cintya Dewi, 24, is the first victim to have been identified among the 189 believed killed when the Lion Air plane crashed into the sea. (Photo: AFP)

JAKARTA: A funeral was held in East Java on Thursday (Nov 1) for the first victim identified in Monday's Lion Air plane crash.

Forensic experts identified Jannatun Cintya Dewi, a civil servant working in Indonesia's Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, as the first victim of the crash on Wednesday evening.

The 24-year-old civil servant's coffin was carried by pallbearers through the streets of her East Java hometown Sidoarjo on Thursday.

Relatives mourned by the grave, which was sprinkled with red, white and yellow flowers, photos show.

Funeral held for first victim in Lion Air crash
Family members mourn next to the grave of Jannatun Cintya Dewi. (Photo: AFP)

Dewi's mother collapsed and had to be carried into their home, while friends and relatives wiped away tears as the casket was laid.

So far only body parts and debris have been found. Human remains in dozens of body bags had been recovered and sent to a hospital in Jakarta, officials said.

"We've examined 48 body bags of victim remains and we could identify one victim through primary identification, which is fingerprints and dental records," said police brigadier-general Hudi Suryanto.

"The condition of the remains found were better than most so ... the identification is somewhat easier."

Funeral held for first victim in Lion Air crash
Family members gather with the parents of Jannatun Cintya Dewi. (Photo: AFP)

READ: Lion Air crash: Families 'still hoping for a miracle' as search intensifies

Analysts hope further victims could still be found with the bulk of the wreckage.

"I assume that there will be a lot of bodies still strapped into the seats," aviation analyst Dudi Sudibyo told AFP.

After four days of round-the-clock searching, Indonesian officials brought one of the black boxes from Lion Air flight JT610 to shore in northern Jakarta.

READ: Black box from Lion Air crash brought back to shore

The flight data recorder arrived at the Jakarta International Container Terminal on Thursday.

Officials hope that it will help to create a clear picture about the plane’s final moments and the reasons it fell from the sky.

Source: Agencies/nh(hm)

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