Malaysia's Najib denies seeking police protection

Malaysia's Najib denies seeking police protection

Najib in Pekan
Former prime minister Najib Razak with supporters from his constituency in Pekan on Sunday (May 20). (Photo: Melissa Goh)

KUALA LUMPUR: Former prime minister Najib Razak denied on Sunday (May 20) that he has sought protection from the police over the ongoing money laundering probe involving state fund 1MDB.

He was speaking to Channel NewsAsia upon his arrival at Sri Kenangan, his official residence in his home constituency of Pekan.

Asked why he had sought protection, Najib said: "No, no, I am not ..."

It was online portal the Malay Mail which reported that Najib had filed a police report on Friday and asked for witness protection, claiming he and his family members had received threats from Malaysia as well as overseas.

Despite Najib's denials, the Malay Mail insisted that he did seek protection. The portal quoted a police source as saying that the former prime minister had expressly used the term "witness protection" in his police report.

Meanwhile, his arrival in Pekan on Sunday was greeted by almost a hundred Umno grassroots leaders and supporters.

Najib was seen hugging them - some in tears.

As their MP since 1976, he thanked them for their concerns and support all these years while his wife Rosmah Mansor was heard telling the female supporters not to shed tears.

The convoy travelled by road for more than three hours from Kuala Lumpur to Pekan.

"The people wanted me to come back to be with them to show their appreciation and continued support for me for all the things I have done for them.

"They want me to continue to serve them as MP and I am glad to be back to be surrounded by friends and supporters, people who have been with me for the past 42 years."

Najib, who is expected to officiate an UMNO branch meeting while in Pekan later in the day, joined supporters as they prepared bubur lambuk, a traditional porridge for breaking fast in the evening.

Najib in Pekan
Former prime minister Najib Razak with supporters from his constituency in Pekan on Sunday (May 20). (Photo: Melissa Goh)

Among the women involved in the task was Khadijah Ahmad who heads the single mothers association in Pekan. She said that her husband used to tutor Najib in the Malay language when he first returned from the UK to helm the state after his father, Malaysia's second prime minister Abdul Razak, died in 1976. 

Wishing she could turn back the clock for the former prime minister, she said: “I pray that all these bad things that happened to Mr Najib could go away and he will be fine."

Source: CNA/mn

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