Charlize Theron hopes her daughters feel represented in Hollywood

Charlize Theron hopes her daughters feel represented in Hollywood

The Oscar winner says she hopes the current movement against racial injustice leads to lasting change.

Charlize Theron
This Feb. 9, 2020 file photo shows actress Charlize Theron at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills, Calif. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

Charlize Theron says she's making choices as a producer and actor to ensure her "two small, beautiful African American daughters" will feel represented on-screen.

The Oscar winner said it can be hard for black children to "kind of imagine the possibilities" when so few films and television series are centred on characters that look like them. 

"I was raised during the Apartheid era in South Africa. So, I come with a lot of that baggage already," Theron said. "I was part of a system that I as a white person benefited from in South Africa. And that's a tremendous amount of guilt that I carried, and still carry my entire life. I'm in therapy over it," Theron said in an interview promoting her action thriller The Old Guard, which hits Netflix Jul 10.

"It would be impossible for me to not have that somehow be rectified in what I can do in my job as a producer, as an actor – and the responsibility that I take, the accountability that I take of what I put out there for not only my two young girls, but for young girls out there in general."

Charlize Theron The Old Guard
This image released by Netflix shows Charlize Theron, left, and Kiki Layne in a scene from "The Old Guard," premiering Jul 10 on Netflix. (Aimee Spinks/Netflix via AP)

Director Gina Prince-Bythewood directed The Old Guard, which was based on a graphic novel and stars Theron alongside an international cast including Aladdin star Marwan Kenzari. KiKi Layne plays a US Marine who joins Theron's group of centuries-old immortal warriors.

Theron says she's been watching recent protests around racial injustice in the US through the lens of her home country's history. She hopes the current movement leads to lasting change, particularly in promoting diversity within Hollywood.

"We move five steps forward and we pat ourselves on the back, and then we just stop. And that's been the danger, a dangerous place that we've lived in, in my industry," she said. 

(Source: CNA/AP)

Source: CNA/AP

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