Hari Raya Puasa in Singapore falls on Jun 15: Mufti

Hari Raya Puasa in Singapore falls on Jun 15: Mufti

Hari Raya bazaar on Jul 27, 2014
File photo of a Hari Raya Bazaar at Geylang Serai. (Photo: TODAY/Wee Teck Hian)

SINGAPORE: Muslims in Singapore will celebrate Hari Raya Aidilfitri on Friday (Jun 15), marking the end of a month-long period of fasting, the Mufti of Singapore announced on Thursday. 

"I would like to take this opportunity to wish all Muslims in Singapore: 'Selamat Hari Raya Aidilfitri'. May Allah accept all our deeds throughout Ramadan and may we meet Ramadan again next year," Dr Mohamed Fatris Bakaram said in a statement.

The Archbishop of Singapore Most Reverend William Goh, on behalf of the Catholic Archdiocese of Singapore, also wished Mr Abdul Razak, the CEO of the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (MUIS), a "very happy and holy Hari Raya Aidilfiltri".

"We rejoice and are glad, dear friends, that we have the privilege of journeying with you side by side in our endeavours to break barriers, to build bridges and bonds of friendship and fraternal charity in our nation," he said in a letter.

"Despite the circumstances of today's world, where there is so much fake news, stereotyping and prejudice, suspicion, individualism, isolationism, indifference, complacency and even defeatism, we have endured and preserved boldly in our interfaith mission to forge lasting relationships of trust and safety in our common spaces with humility, patience and perseverance," he added.

Responding to the letter, Dr Fatris thanked the Archbishop for his kind wishes, saying that he hopes the strong bonds between both communities will continue to enhance the Muslim community's resilience and resolve to stay connected regardless of challenges.

"Muslims are reminded that the spirituality nurtured in Ramadan is to be channeled to positive deeds which would contribute to the continuous prosperity, peace and development of our society and country," Dr Fatris said.

"Like many other faiths, we are united in the conviction that we will not confine our benevolence or compassion to our own communities. The universal values of compassion, empathy, humility, love and care for others, regardless of race or creed, as espoused in our traditions further strengthen the shared concerns we have for humanity, especially the disadvantaged in society," he added.

Source: CNA/na(aj)

Bookmark