Hong Kong restaurant owner assisting police with investigation on Singapore event related to protests

Hong Kong restaurant owner assisting police with investigation on Singapore event related to protests

Hong Kong restaurant chain owner Alex Yeung
Hong Kong restaurant chain owner Alex Yeung. (Screengrab: Alex Yeung's YouTube channel)

SINGAPORE: A Hong Kong restaurant owner is assisting the Singapore authorities with their investigation over an event in Singapore where people could share their views on the Hong Kong protests, police said on Thursday (Nov 7). 

In a Facebook post, the authorities said they were alerted on Oct 11 to an incident involving Mr Alex Yeung, a Hong Kong resident, "who allegedly organised a gathering for interested persons to share their views on the current protests in Hong Kong". 

Police said that the event was initially held at the Kimoto Gastro Bar located at The Sail @ Marina Bay, but was shifted to a "public area in the vicinity of The Promontory". 

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"Currently, Yeung’s passport has been impounded while he is assisting the police with ongoing investigations."

"He is, however, neither arrested nor in police custody, and is free to go about his activities within Singapore," the authorities said. 

The Chinese-ruled city of Hong Kong has been embroiled in anti-government unrest for several months, after what started as rallies against a now-dead extradition Bill erupted into a wider movement calling for greater freedoms and police accountability.

Hong Kong restaurant owner Alex Yeung stands in front of barricades
Hong Kong restaurant owner Alex Yeung stands in front of barricades after a protest in the city of Hong Kong in a video posted on his YouTube channel. (Screengrab: Alex Yeung's YouTube channel)

Mr Yeung said in a YouTube video posted on Monday he had planned to stay in Singapore from Oct 10 to Oct 12 to seek business opportunities.

"I have never thought of breaking any laws in Singapore … I have never been in politics," said the founder of the Wah Kee chain of restaurants, who has drawn the ire of anti-government protesters in Hong Kong for his pro-China views.

"The police would like to remind the public that organising or participating in a public assembly without a police permit in Singapore is illegal and constitutes an offences under the Public Order Act," said the Singapore authorities. 

"The police will not grant any permit for assemblies that advocate political causes of other countries. Foreigners visiting or living in Singapore should abide by our laws," they added. 

READ: Our coverage of the Hong Kong protests

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Source: CNA/ec(hs)

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