MOE, CPE to study measures to improve quality of private education

MOE, CPE to study measures to improve quality of private education

According to the Council of Private Education's Graduate Employment Survey of the nine largest PEIs in Singapore, the employment outcome of fresh graduates from PEIs is much lower than the outcome of graduates from autonomous universities.

Lasalle convocation

SINGAPORE: The Ministry of Education (MOE) and the Council for Private Education (CPE) are studying further measures that may need to be introduced to improve the quality of education and employment outcomes of graduates from private education institutions (PEIs). These measures are likely to be rolled out in the coming months.

According to CPE's Graduate Employment Survey of the nine largest PEIs in Singapore, the employment outcome of fresh graduates from PEIs is much lower than the outcome of graduates from autonomous universities.

Around 4,200 students who graduated from bachelor's programmes at nine PEIs took part in the survey, which was conducted from December last year to June this year.

Only 58 per cent of these full-time graduates secured full-time permanent employment within six months of completing their final examinations. This compares to 83 per cent for graduates from autonomous universities.

In addition, these private school graduates in full-time permanent employment earned a median gross monthly salary of S$2,700, S$500 less than their counterparts from autonomous universities.

The survey was conducted to gather data to help prospective students make informed course decisions. Acting Minister for Education (Higher Education and Skills) Ong Ye Kung revealed the results at the convocation ceremony for LASALLE College of the Arts on Friday (Sep 23).

He said: "Students intending to enrol into degree programmes at PEIs need to know these pragmatic but important facts. As a whole, we want to see the quality of education and employment outcomes of this sector improve. MOE and the Council for Private Education are studying further measures that may need to be introduced for this purpose."

Mr Ong also strongly encouraged students to research their options carefully, and assess if the course will help them acquire relevant skills for future employment. “When you make a decision to pursue a degree, it should be after a thorough exploration of the choices and pathways available - not because a degree programme is the default pathway,” he said.

Under the SkillsFuture movement, Government post-secondary education institutions as well as universities are developing new pathways to offer a wider range of courses for those who wish to upgrade and sharpen their skills.

This year, LASALLE saw the graduation of its pioneer batch of students in MA Arts Pedagogy and Practice, a first-of-its-kind programme in the region.

Launched in 2014, the programme trains contemporary art educators on the integration of arts pedagogy into their work, to equip them with their knowledge and skills to better nurture future generations of emerging artists and contribute to the growth of Singapore creative industries.

The programme has received strong interest and demand since its inception and the current intake has increased to 19 from 12 in 2014.

Source: CNA/ms

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