PMD rider to be charged for hitting elderly man with belt in footpath altercation

PMD rider to be charged for hitting elderly man with belt in footpath altercation

Man riding an e-scooter in Berlin
A man riding an e-scooter. (File photo: AFP/Tobias Schwarz)

SINGAPORE: A 33-year-old personal mobility device (PMD) rider who allegedly hit an elderly man with his belt will be charged on Tuesday (Feb 11).

The PMD user was riding on a footpath on Nov 29 last year when he got into an argument with the 72-year-old man, the police said. 

He then allegedly used his belt buckle to hit the older man, causing lacerations on his forehead.

The elderly man was taken conscious to the hospital, the police said.

The PMD rider will be charged in court with voluntarily causing hurt by dangerous means. If convicted, he faces up to three years of jail time, a fine of up to S$5,000, or both.

READ: Footpath ban for all motorised PMDs from April; minimum age requirement and online theory test to follow

READ: E-scooter ban on footpaths to extend to all motorised PMDs under amendments to Active Mobility Act

Electric scooters were banned from footpaths in Singapore on Nov 5 last year. The ban was later expanded to include other motorised PMDs, such as hoverboards and electric skateboards.

The police said in their news release that there has been an increasing number of fights and harassment between PMD riders and pedestrians.

In one incident, five PMD users who were riding on a footpath hurled vulgarities at a person who had filmed them and pushed him from the back, causing him to sustain minor injuries.

In another case, a PMD user was riding on a footpath and rang his bell for a pedestrian to give way. The pedestrian did not do so, and punched the rider after he was stopped from recording a video of him.

The Singapore Police Force advised members of the public to refrain from confrontations and reminded PMD riders to adhere to the new regulations. 

"The police will investigate all reports and take action against those who intentionally harass or cause hurt to others," it warned.

Source: CNA/nh(cy)

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