Revamped Sengkang Public Library opens doors to public

Revamped Sengkang Public Library opens doors to public

Now spanning two storeys, the library's floor area of 2,141 sqm offers 18 per cent more space than the old facility.

Revamped Sengkang library 1

SINGAPORE: The newly revamped Sengkang Public Library has opened at Compass One Mall with a larger space and new features such as being the first library to have a dedicated space for those aged between 10 and 14.

It was officially opened by Communications and Information Minister Yaacob Ibrahim on Saturday (Mar 18) after being closed for renovations since October 2015.

Now spanning two storeys, the library's floor area of 2,141 sqm offers 18 per cent more space than the old facility. It also has more space for visitors to sit with 232 seats available, as well as customised spaces for teens and adults.

Revamped Sengkang library 2

About 125,000 books, 300 magazine titles and 4,000 audio-visual items are on offer.

The Sengkang library's design is inspired by the area's history as a riverside port and fishing village, and takes reference from the shapes and colours of the coast.

CUSTOMISED SPACES
Based on feedback from about 500 regular library goers, the place is designed with the needs of various users in mind.

For example, the children's area is segmented into different spaces and has an open concept storytelling area, equipped with an interactive projector. As for children aged six and below, the early literacy area includes parking areas for prams.

The tween zone, for those aged 10 to 14, is designed to support experiential learning and has flexible seating to facilitate group activities.

There are also programmes held every Friday, exploring subjects like comics, music and photography.

As for adults, there is a separate and well-insulated floor to enjoy a quieter reading environment. Eight multimedia stations are also available - an increase from the six previously.

Revamped Sengkang library 3

For the first time, library visitors will get a chance to see how their returned books are sorted, as they are offered a look into the back room. A computerised system, known as the AutoSorter, mechanically separates returned items into specific categories for easy shelving by staff and service partners.

The machine also uses data analytics to identify popular titles for staff to place at the "Just Returned" shelves.

Source: CNA/kk

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