SNOC to 'regroup' with affected sports associations following Olympic postponement

SNOC to 'regroup' with affected sports associations following Olympic postponement

Swimming - Men's 100m Butterfly Victory Ceremony
Joseph Schooling celebrates on the podium after winning gold in the Men's 100m Butterfly at the 2016 Olympics. (REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci)

SINGAPORE: The Singapore National Olympic Council (SNOC) will "regroup" with affected National Sports Associations (NSAs) following the postponement of the 2020 Olympics, a spokesperson from the organisation said on Tuesday (Mar 24).

This follows a joint-statement issued by the International Olympics Committee (IOC) and the Tokyo 2020 organising committee on Tuesday that the Games "must be rescheduled to a date beyond 2020 but not later than summer 2021".

READ: Japan, Olympics chief agree to postpone Tokyo Games over COVID-19

"The decision made by the IOC and Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee to postpone the 2020 Olympic Games is one made under difficult circumstances," the SNOC spokesperson said. 

"We will regroup with the affected National Sports Associations to review any changes and updates from their respective International Federations on the qualification process, and revisions to their selection policies if any, and address any concerns from our athletes. 


"We hope by then Team Singapore will be able to participate in the Olympic Games and celebrate the triumph of sports, but also humanity, without the risks the world is facing now."

'THE RIGHT MOVE': JOSEPH SCHOOLING

In a statement, Singapore's reigning Olympic champion Joseph Schooling called the decision to postpone the Olympics "the right move".

Schooling along with a number of Team Singapore athletes such as diver Jonathan Chan and gymnast Tan Sze En had qualified at the upcoming Games which were to begin in late July.

"I am pleased that the IOC and the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee has come to a decision. This is undoubtedly a tough call but not an unexpected one," said Schooling, who won gold in the 100m butterfly at the 2016 Olympics in Rio. 

"I believe this is the right move so as to not endanger the health and well-being of athletes and the public," he said.

"As athletes, we need to focus on being prepared and giving ourselves the best possible chance of success at the largest sporting event in the world. This decision gives us clarity as we recalibrate and work out the best plan around the new dates of the Olympics Games Tokyo 2020."

Source: CNA/mt(mn)

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