3 Factors That Can Make Your Employees Unhappy

3 Factors That Can Make Your Employees Unhappy

Do you have an employee who just hasn’t been performing up to his usual standards lately? Like you, your staff have their own unique combinations of personal and professional stress-causers which can make it extremely difficult for them to stay afloat.

3 Factors That Can Make Your Employees Unhappy

As a boss who cares, you need to watch out for signs of possible meltdowns and be prepared to step in. Here are three reasons why you may have a less-than-happy trooper on your team and how you can help.
 
Lack of motivation
 
If an active employee suddenly stops offering constructive contributions, it could mean that he is no longer motivated at work. Other signs of sliding interests include arriving late, more sick days, and avoiding interaction with colleagues and superiors.
 
Depending on the nature of this behavior, you may conduct anonymous surveys or hold one-to-one discussions on what might be the issue. Some possible causes for this are a lack of leadership, inefficient work distribution and the inability to meet personal needs. Revising the workload and upping training could help.

Poisonous office politics
 
Sometimes, it has less to do with the work and more to do with the workplace. Politics in the office can dampen spirits. Is your employee feeling harassed, victimised or excluded? Look out for harsh language, aggressiveness and egos that may intimidate.
 
Like the schoolyard bully, the workplace one needs to be confronted. Hostile office environments are poisonous and should not be tolerated. Keep your ear to the ground, observe interactions, and hold frequent discussions and performance reviews to nip the problem in the bud.

Matters at home
 
Don’t assume that every unhappy employee is unhappy because of work. Erratic behaviour, irritability, mood swings and prolonged disappearances may be signs of substance abuse as well.
 
Employees who work late into the night with no cause, sleep at their desks or groom themselves at the office may be facing issues at home.
 
Requiring more immediate attention are employees who display uncharacteristic isolation, neglect their appearances and hygiene, and become suddenly generous with their possessions. It is possible that they are suffering from depression or suicidal tendencies.
 
While it may not be your place to interfere in your employee’s personal affairs, there are still steps that you can take to help. Make time to talk with to them privately and offer support professionally.  Is there workplace counselling or employee assistance programmes? Could you give time off to attend to personal affairs? If it’s serious enough, consider temporarily cutting down on work pressures so that they can concentrate on getting back on track on the personal front.

The key is to read signs - watching your employees and walking in their shoes will open your eyes to how they feel, and what could be bothering them. Offer support where you can and make sure to follow up so that employees don’t feel the need to keep issues in the dark.
 
When you can keep your employees happy, your business will also prosper. So, take care of your assets.

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