US forecasters say flooding possible this week along Texas coast

US forecasters say flooding possible this week along Texas coast

People stand on the beach and look at the surf before Hurricane Florence comes ashore in Carolina B
People stand on the beach and look at the surf before Hurricane Florence comes ashore in Carolina Beach, North Carolina, U.S., September 11, 2018. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri/File Photo

HOUSTON: A tropical storm may form off the Texas Gulf Coast by Friday, bringing heavy rains to areas already drenched in the past few weeks, US government and private forecasters said on Tuesday (Sep 11).

The US National Hurricane Center said a tropical wave on the north coast of the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico had a 70 per cent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone within five days.

The United States is already bracing for Hurricane Florence, a major Category 4 hurricane expected to make landfall on the US East Coast on Friday, bringing high winds and days of heavy rains.

Over 45 per cent of US oil refining capacity is located along the Gulf Coast from Corpus Christi, Texas, to Pascagoula, Mississippi, along with 51 per cent of the nation's natural gas processing capacity, according to the US Energy Information Administration.

Satellite images show a disorganized but developing system, said Dan Kottlowski, lead hurricane forecaster for Accuweather Inc. It expects a tropical depression or weak storm to form and come ashore near Corpus Christi.

"This is the precursor of something trying to get organised," Kottlowski said in an interview.

The US Coast Guard said in a weather briefing on Tuesday that the tropical wave was expected to reach the mid- to lower Texas coast by Friday. The storm could bring 4 to 6 inches (10-15 cm) of rain near Corpus Christi by Sunday night, the Coast Guard said.

Portions of the Texas coast have received heavy rains in the past week as Tropical Storm Gordon drew moisture from the Gulf of Mexico inland.

A year ago, Hurricane Harvey swamped the Gulf Coast with more than 50 inches (1.3 m) or rain in some locations, shutting a quarter of US refining capacity, leading to regional fuel shortages and pushing prices higher nationwide.

(Reporting by Erwin Seba; Editing by Peter Cooney)

Source: Reuters/na

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