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Four feared dead after Typhoon Nanmadol hits Japan, 140,000 homes still lack power

Four feared dead after Typhoon Nanmadol hits Japan, 140,000 homes still lack power

People share an umbrella against strong wind and rain as they walk on a bridge on Sep 20, 2022, in Kawasaki, near Tokyo. (Photo: AP/Eugene Hoshiko)

TOKYO: Two people were confirmed dead and another two were found "without vital signs" after Typhoon Nanmadol slammed into Japan over the weekend, a government spokesman said Tuesday (Sep 20).

The storm system made landfall by the southwestern city of Kagoshima on Sunday night and dumped heavy rain across the Kyushu region before moving along the west coast.

By Tuesday morning, it was downgraded to an extratropical cyclone as it crossed to the northeastern coast and headed out to sea.

The storm toppled trees, smashed windows and dumped a month's worth of rain in a 24-hour period on parts of Miyazaki prefecture, where the two deaths were confirmed.

Government spokesman Hirozaku Matsuno said another two people had been found "without vital signs," a term often used in Japan before a death has been officially certified by a coroner.

He said authorities were also searching for one person reported missing.

At least 114 people were injured, 14 of them seriously.

By early Tuesday, about 140,000 homes were still without power nationwide, mostly in Kyushu.

On Tanegashima island, south of Kyushu island, a wall was damaged at a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s space centre, the Economy and Industry Ministry said. The extent of damage to the building used for rocket assembly was being assessed.

A person rides a bicycle against strong wind and rain on Sep 20, 2022, in Kawasaki, near Tokyo. (Photo: AP/Eugene Hoshiko)
A person holds an umbrella against strong wind and rain on Sep 20, 2022, in Kawasaki, near Tokyo. (Photo: AP/Eugene Hoshiko)

Two deaths were reported in Miyazaki prefecture on Japan’s southern main island of Kyushu on Monday, when the storm was more powerful, the Fire and Disaster Management Agency said. One was a man was found in a car sunk in a flooded farm in Miyakonojo town, and another was found underneath a landslide in Mimata.

Most transportation returned to normal on Tuesday when commuters returned to work after a three-day weekend. Bullet trains and most ground transportation resumed operation, but dozens of flights were grounded in northeastern Japan.

Japan is currently in its typhoon season and faces around 20 such storms a year.

Scientists say climate change is increasing the severity of storms and causing extreme weather such as heat waves, droughts and flash floods to become more frequent and intense.

This handout photo provided by US astronaut Bob Hines on Sep 18, 2022, shows an overhead view of Typhoon Nanmadol from space. (Photo: AFP/NASA/Bob Hines)
This handout photo provided by US astronaut Bob Hines on Sep 18, 2022, shows an overhead view of Typhoon Nanmadol from space. (Photo: AFP/NASA/Bob Hines)
Source: Agencies/rc
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