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Former Wildlife Reserves Singapore assistant director charged with corruption involving more than S$200,000

Former Wildlife Reserves Singapore assistant director charged with corruption involving more than S$200,000

File photo of a gavel. (File photo: CNA/Jeremy Long)

SINGAPORE: A former assistant director of Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS) was charged on Friday (Mar 11) with corruption involving more than S$200,000.

Goh Meng Kwee faces 10 charges under the Prevention of Corruption Act for allegedly obtaining bribes of more than S$150,000 from several people between 2014 and 2018. This was in exchange for advancing the business interests of various companies with WRS, said the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB) in a media release.

The 49-year-old is also accused of using about S$44,000 of the bribes to pay for a car - a Mercedes-Benz B200 - in 2017. For this, he faces two charges under the Corruption, Drug Trafficking and Other Serious Crimes (Confiscation of Benefits) Act. 

There is also an additional corruption charge for allegedly receiving S$50,000 from two people in May 2018 “as an inducement for advancing their company’s business interests with a WRS contractor”, CPIB said. 

Six other people were charged in court with corruption on Friday in connection with Goh's alleged offences. 

They are: 
•    Ng Yeow Seng, the director of Ascension Engineering Services
•    Neo Chye Koon and Wong Chee Thiam, the directors of Magnum Precision Industries
•    Ng Thiam Huat, the director of United Channel Construction & Facility Services
•    Tay Chun Hsiong, the business development manager of Lantro
•    Fang Yih Uei, the director of RH Creation

All are accused of giving or conspiring to give bribes of between S$20,000 to S$72,000 to Goh for advancing their business interests with WRS or a WRS contractor. 

Two of the men - Ng Thiam Huat and Tay - face an additional charge each. 

Tay allegedly obtained a S$3,000 bribe from Ng Thiam Huat as a reward for furthering the man's business interests with the company Tay worked for. 

Those convicted of a corruption offence can be jailed for up to five years, fined up to S$100,000, or both.

For a money laundering offence under the Corruption, Drug Trafficking and Other Serious Crimes (Confiscation of Benefits) Act, those found guilty can be jailed for up to 10 years, fined up to S$500,000, or both.

Source: CNA/lk(gr)

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