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COVID-19 cases in Singapore fall for second straight day with 2,057 infections, 6 more deaths reported

COVID-19 cases in Singapore fall for second straight day with 2,057 infections, 6 more deaths reported

People wearing face masks while crossing a road on May 24, 2021, amid the COVID-19 outbreak in Singapore. (File photo: Marcus Mark Ramos)

SINGAPORE: Singapore reported 2,057 new COVID-19 cases as of noon on Sunday (Oct 3), the second straight day the country has seen a fall in new infections.

There were also six more deaths from complications due to the coronavirus. 

All six people who died were Singaporeans, comprising five men and a woman. They were aged between 68 and 91 years.

Among them, two had been unvaccinated against COVID-19, and four had been vaccinated. Five of them had various underlying medical conditions, while an unvaccinated case had no known medical conditions.

Singapore's death toll now stands at 113.

Of the new cases, 2,049 were locally transmitted infections, comprising 1,676 cases in the community and 373 dormitory residents.

Among these cases were 430 seniors above the age of 60, said MOH in its daily update released to the media at about 11pm.

There were also eight imported cases, all detected upon arrival in Singapore.

As of Sunday, Singapore has reported a total of 103,843 COVID-19 cases since the start of the pandemic. 

HOSPITALISATIONS

There were 1,337 patients warded in hospital, most of whom were well and under observation, said MOH.

Among them were 250 cases of serious illness who required oxygen supplementation, and 35 in critical condition in the intensive care unit (ICU). Of those who had fallen very ill, 242 were above the age of 60.

Over the last 28 days, the percentage of local cases who were asymptomatic or had mild symptoms was 98.1 per cent.

In that period, 539 cases required oxygen supplementation and 55 had been in the ICU. Of these, 50.2 per cent were fully vaccinated and 49.8 per cent were unvaccinated or partially vaccinated.

ACTIVE CLUSTERS

MOH said it was currently “closely monitoring” nine active clusters, including seven dormitories, Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre, and a nursing home. 

All the dormitory clusters involve intra-dormitory transmission among residents with no evidence of spread beyond the dormitory, said MOH. 

There were three new cases at the cluster at Pasir Panjang Wholesale Centre, bringing the total to 240 infections. 

Of the cases, 221 are workers at the market, four are trade visitors and 15 are household members of cases, said MOH. 

 

VACCINATIONS

As of Saturday, 82 per cent of Singapore’s population has completed their full vaccination regimen or received two doses of COVID-19 vaccines, while 85 per cent has received at least one dose.

More than 9.2 million doses have been administered under the national vaccination programme, including 279,787 booster jabs, MOH said.

Another 201,185 doses of other vaccines recognised in the World Health Organization’s emergency list have been administered, covering 103,723 people.

MORE COVID-19 TREATMENT FACILITIES TO BE SET UP 

More COVID-19 treatment facilities (CTF) will be set up in the coming weeks to reduce the strain on acute hospitals, as Singapore sees a spike in local infections. 

There will be nine COVID-19 treatment facilities with an overall capacity of about 3,700 beds by the end of October, MOH said on Saturday.

Four of these facilities were set up over the past week, with a capacity of 580 beds.

Health Minister Ong Ye Kung said 700 beds will be set up at Singapore Expo and another 200 at Sengkang General Hospital. Beds will also be set up at Yishun and Ren Ci community hospitals. 

They will be used to care for higher-risk patients who require close observation but do not need to be hospitalised. Such patients include seniors with co-morbidities who are asymptomatic or with mild symptoms. 

The facilities are meant to "augment and complement" hospital capacity, said the Health Ministry in a media release.

"This is an important step towards right-siting care and reducing the strain on our acute hospitals which should be preserved for those who require immediate acute hospital care, both COVID-19 as well as non-COVID patients," the ministry added. 

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Source: CNA/vc

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