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Malaysia to use black soldier fly larvae in organic waste treatment

Malaysia to use black soldier fly larvae in organic waste treatment

File photo of black soldier flies. (Photo: Bernama)

TANAH MERAH: Malaysia will soon use black soldier fly larvae to process organic waste, including those in landfills, said the country's Environment and Water Ministry on Sunday (Apr 17). 

"The larvae of this species of fly are the best model used for sustainable food waste disposal, besides helping to reduce dumping of food waste into landfills," said Environment and Water Minister Tuan Ibrahim Tuan Man.

Speaking at the launch of the project at the Tanah Merah wholesale market site, the minister said black soldier flies will be used to process various daily organic waste, as well as to protect the environment and reduce pollution. 

The black soldier fly facility will process waste products collected from the Manal wholesale market and the Bandar Tanah Merah general market. The larvae will also be kept at a special house located behind both markets. 

The process is expected to reduce waste dumped in landfills, equivalent to a potential reduction of 3 tonnes of carbon dioxide per day, said Mr Tuan Ibrahim. He added that the facility could also produce compost to replace chemical fertilisers for the local authorities' use. 

The programme will be expanded across Malaysia to meet the target of 100 Green Houses of Worship that the Environment and Water Ministry has set, he said. 

The Tanah Merah District Council, as well as the state government through Kelantan Utilities Mubaarakan Holdings, Universiti Kelantan Malaysia and the Kelantan Women Development Centre were involved in the project, he added. 

A total of RM35 million was allocated under the People and Economic Strategic Empowerment Programme, approved by the government involving local authorities in Malaysia, said Mr Tuan Ibrahim. 

"To date, a total of 141 local authorities have utilised the allocation to implement various low–carbon city initiatives including energy, water, waste, mobility and greenery in public areas or facilities," he added.

The Sustainable Waste Management Project is funded by the Low-Carbon Cities Catalyst Grant under Malaysia's Environment and Water Ministry through the Malaysian Green Technology and Climate Change Corporation. 

Source: Bernama/lk(zl)

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